Type of riding with Dartmoor Riding Holidays

Trail rides, the Dartmoor Crossing & Cattle Drives
(Strong intermediate or better)

DCIM100GOPRO

 

We normally ride Western, however we can provide English saddles if the guests requests. Riders need to be reasonably fit and at least a strong intermediate standard or better. The terrain involves crossing streams, shallow rivers, undulating ground and up and down steep inclines and would not be suitable for novice or inexperienced riders.

Our style of riding is very much akin to ‘Natural Horsemanship’. We like riders to be relaxed and ride with soft hands.

Your Riding ability

‘If you climb in the saddle, be ready for the ride!’

We are not a riding school, and we do not give tuition, our horses are fit, forward going and sure footed. For our rides you need to be an intermediate or better. Our programs are not suitable for novice or inexperienced riders.

Age range is 18 to 65, experienced 14 – 17 year olds accepted if accompanied by a riding parent/guardian.
Maximum weight 15 Stone (95kg)

The Strong Intermediate Rider

 The strong intermediate rider has ridden several different types of horses and can independently manage a horse’s care. Their seat is secure, they are able to control a horse at walk, trot and canter and do not apply unintentional aids to the horse when they lose balance or become unseated. They know how to rise or post to the trot and ask for and obtain a specific lead or change in lead. They are capable of riding a less experienced horse and helping in that horse’s training. They are able to train/compete at a more advanced level with a trainer’s assistance. The rider is knowledgeable about different horse breeds and disciplines. He or she knows basic horse conformation and can detect lameness issues.

What is included.

Accommodation in en-suite room with colour TV and wi-fi
Breakfast, lunch and after ride tea & cakes
Transfer to and from the farm and accommodation

What is not included

Transfers to and from airport/station etc (available at nominal charge)
Evening meals (where you stay has a restaurant)
Protective wear, n.b. hard hats are mandatory, we have a limited supply, though guests are recommended to bring their own.
Chaps, waterproof coats.

What to bring

For the rider (We are very casual):
‘There is no such thing as bad weather, just inappropriate clothing!’

Meldon Farm sits at 800 ft, we rise to 2,000ft where it can be quite a bit cooler than at the farm, we strongly recommend warm riding wear and good riding waterproofs, a long slicker type is usually the most practical

  • Riding hat, mandatoryn.b. we have a limited supply of hats
  • Boots with heels are also mandatory
  • Comfortable warm riding wear, jeans, polo shirts, jumpers, fleece shower-proof coat etc.
  • Chaps full or half. (optional)
  • Waterproof coat, ‘Drizabone’ slicker type is recommended
  • Lip balm and sun cream
  • Casual evening wear

 

Our horses.

We have a selection of fantastic Quarter Horses with their calm attitude and appetite for work, all are western trained, very sure footed and a pleasure to ride. We also have a selection of Irish hunters some western trained some English style, all a a pleasure to ride and cross the terrain with ease. Heights range from 14:3 to 16:2hh

L-R:

L-R: Fred, Flash, Ollie, Grace, Pebbles, Storm, Ollie

We usually start and back our own horses to suit our type of work, all must be sensible with good manners.

We have a selection of other horses that we can match to guests.

Your Horse

Your horse will be matched to you as far as possible, we have a good selection, but it is important for us to know your ability.

Health and Safety

‘Don’t stop kickin’ til the clock stops tickin’

Guests must be confident, reasonably fit and have some riding experience, we are not a riding school, and we ride over some big country. We only take experienced u18’s if accompanied by a riding parent/guardian, guests should have their own holiday insurance, all guests to wear hard hats and individual body protection is optional. The guides are all local moor men or women, who know the moor well. They know where the best crossings are, and where to avoid, as there are areas where it is unsuitable for horses. Some of the guides are members the Dartmoor Rescue Group; some are range clearers for the army on the moor. All are excellent horsemen or women, and are first-aid trained.